About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 13
CNNW 4
CSPAN2 3
KGO (ABC) 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 3
CNBC 2
CNN 2
WJLA 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
WBAL (NBC) 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
to study. math and science. and english. exactly, yeah. i did not go to university, but being able to help them, i feel excited. >> i am going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> and i'm going to be a nurse. >> the work that we're doing here is bringing change. >>> if there is one good thing about this storm it's that you can get evacuation information, all kinds of information through a lot of different sources. i'm going to tell you how you can do that online. we're downstairs in the cnn newsline. usually not that busy on a sunday night. we brought some people in. tom, one of the managers, and devon, i'm sorry, i had your e-mail up on the air. now he's getting random e-mails from everywhere. stop e-mailing devon. you can get information from tv news conferences, twitter feeds. we want to go to cnn's lori sau segall standing by for us in new york. >> reporter: a lot of people going to nyc.gov. i would say go to wnyc, this is important if you're in the new york area, in the northeast region, you can really look at the different zones. see what zone you're in. i went to it
and from here it's going to go up. the tidal predictions are to the exact science. it's almost like river forecasts. the high drolgss make them with the best knowledge they have. it's not as good as your forecast we give you days in advan advance. it's not the exact science. fluid situation with the storm and a lot of factors and so right now, we're thinking it's going to be about two to three feet higher than what we saw when it was down here on the edge splashing over. that means if i was standing right here at about 8:30 this evening, the water could potentially be somewhere between here to here with wave action over the top of that. this is a flat area in lower manhattan. not a lot of elevation change. about three blocks in inland they have the subways all sandbagged. they are expecting the worst and the possibility of all the water heading underground to the subway system. normally it's heavy rains. they do get flooded. this is saltwater. the electrical switches, all the problems they could have with that. think of the nightmare they would have trying to replace that stuff if it got
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
'll send it back to youm. >> thank you, lara. >>> back out to sam, walk me through the science here, how long could they be on alert in hawaii? >> dan, first of all, as soon as that earthquake happened, knowing that it's 7.7, they did all of the right things. they put the warnings out, thinking that may this would be a bad run of waves. evacuating those lower levels of hawaii were a very good idea. so, you e initially think that first wave would run away from that, remember, this is a subsiding zone, one plate is underneath another plate. a little wave or two and one or two, three, in this case four waves went out and went toward hawaii and down the coast of california as well. now, normally, you would look for the bigger waves and the bigger tsunami problems, at an 58 or 9, they did the absolute right thing by getting those sirens out. these waves have been traveling, like two to four feet in many locations, you can't give everyone the all-clear until the entire system said that the water has traveled. until the buoys have said it's all calm you can't give the all clear. there may be mo
down off the coast of baja, california yesterday afternoon. it brought back a ton of science experiment, medical samples and old space station gear. >>> do you think you have a bad rush hour? take a look. yesterday in madrid more than 2,000 sheep meandered through the city following a route used 800 years ago. it defended ancient grazing rights. >> children aren't always the most diplomatic. kate middleton promoted her book. one girl told the sister of duchess of cambridge what she thought about princesses. >> bet when you were 10 you loved it. >> i hate it. >> well then. excuse me. kate middleton's book called "celebrate" offers tips on entertaining through the year. i'm surprised she didn't have words for pipa. >>> coming up we'll have full coverage of hurricane sandy as it gets ready to make landfall along the mid-atlantic coast. i'm terrell brown reporting from new york this morning. this is the "cbs morning news". his morning. this is the "cbs morning news". [ female announcer ] today, jason is here to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morni
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
. that is why we commit to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child wito. rent. a home, not have a decent school to send your child to. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump and 12 million gallons -- barrels of oil over that time. the will level the playing field for the middle-class. because whenever the middle class is given a chance, they have never ever let their country d
. what is a superstition? >> a belief or an action that is inconsistent with science. it needs to be aimed at bringing about good luck or avoiding bad luck. >> reporter: count yourself lucky if you're not superstitious. connecticut college psychologist stewart says most people are. in a world where we prize science, it may not be something to be proud of. >> i think only 40% of americans believe in evolution. >> reporter: what percent of americans believe in superstition. >> over half of americans have some kind of superstition that they believe in. >> reporter: so more americans have some specific superstition than believe in he have heution. >> that's right. that's not a good thing. >> reporter: a new cbs news poll for sunday morning finds more than half of all americans, knock on wood to avoid bad luck. 16% won't open up as indoors. 13% carry a good luck charm. and one in ten avoids black cats. at halloween we even have a holiday that celebrates our superstitions. nowhere are they celebrated more than here at the blood manor haunted house in new york city where you're surrou
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> all right. we continue to watch hurricane sandy. it's roughly about 200 miles off the coast of north carolina, roughly 500 miles from new york city. but places from north carolina all the way up to maine are bracing. in fact, we have a few updates. d.c., federal offices will be closed to the public tomorrow. we already know that washington, d.c., public schools are closed. more on hurricane sandy straight ahead. we know that mass transit from buses in new york will be closed or will shut down starting at 9:00 this evening and 7:00 for the subway system. that's impacting a bunch of people. much more ahead on "newsroom" with don lemon. this is a monster storm that could take many directions stat. states and cities are taking different directions and you can't be complacent. >> it is almost too late. you have been here since 2:00 on the snare. >> yeah, and you have a long haul for the evening. things will be changing on the dime, we know that.
of the energy sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo i
ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] the way it moves. the way it cleans. everything about the oral-b power brush is simply revolutionary. oral-b power brushes oscillate, rotate and even pulsate to gently loosen and break up that sticky plaque with more brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >> before fox and friends end said, we'll check with maria molina who is tracking sandep for us. hurricane sandy has continued to strengthen and maximum sustained winds at 85 miles per hour. it is shifting to the left and it will make landfall in central and southern new jersey tonight. sandy is a large storm system. you will start to see the impact later today some of you are feeling it in the midatlantic and long island, dealing with the wind that is picking up. sandy could have maximum sustained winds at 90 miles per hour. one of the big concerns is the storm surge. new y
into the pacific ocean after a two week trip up to the space station. brought back a ton of science experiments and equipment. the dragon is the only delivery ship capable now of returning cargo now that the shuttle program has ended. >> in health news, sweating could make you smarter. researchers put 6 adults who didn't exercise on a regular workout program. four months later, the participants were healthier but performed better on cognitive tests. >>> is facebook better than sex? well, it might be. a new study of college aged adults tracked their most irresistible desires and facebook along with checking e-mails and surfing the web were more irresistible. one reason might be it's easier and more convenient to check social media sites than it is to have sex in the middle of the day. >> your facebook is open right now. your twitter account is open. your cbs e-mail is open. your regular e-mail is open. >> and that's all i'm going to say about that. >> we're going to leave it right there. >> the san francisco giant's win has one down side for the fans. couldn't experience the victory at home. >>
this and put yourself in danger? >> ever since i was a kid i had an interest in science and nature and weather and an interest in photography and adventure. storm chasing has allowed me to travel to all 7 component -- continents documenting some of the worst weather in the world. >> describe the scene out there right now? >> right now it is dark here obviously we can't see what's going on. but earlier today the storm surge was outstanding. the ocean was as angry as i have ever seen it. the spot where we were on rockaway beach right on the boardwalk it no longer exists. when we were down there we knew it was going to be bad we could tell from the direction of the wind and what was to come. that was not a safe neighborhood to be in. we were able to get out just in time. the storm surge flooding was just coming in and of course now we are getting reports of the fires there, the complete devastation some of the neighborhoods along the water. >>> george, put the flood in perspective for us? how does this compare to other storms we have seen? >> the easiest one to compare it to would be eirene. i wa
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> announcer: meet mary. she loves to shop online with her debit card, and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard-earned money. now meet jack. after 40 years, he finally saved enough to enjoy retirement. angie, the waitress at jack's favorite diner, is also enjoying his retirement. with just a little information, she's opened up a credit line, draining the equity in jack's home. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take is a little misplaced information to wreak havoc on your life. this is identity theft, and no one helps stop it better than lifelock. see, ordinary credit monitoring services tell you after your identity has been stolen. they may take 30 days to alert you-- too late for jack. lifelock has the most comprehensive identity theft protection available. if mary had lifelock's bank account alerts, she may have been notified in time to help stop it. if j
as once predicted. >>> back out to sam, talk us through the science here. how much longer should they be nervous in hawaii? >> good news, dan, is they did everything right here. 7.7 off the western coast of canada, and nothing but open water between it and hawaii. the plate lying underneath it. it creates a wave. in this case, they thought it was four waves. as we have been counting them. they have the tsunami warning center. all of these buoys that are between that coastline and hawaii, they're able to monitor the lift in that water. buoy, as the water comes up, the sensor knows how high wave that is. these waves could have been ablgt-foot waves. the good news is, we have kind of seen those waves move through. more than one. in this case, they're able to see, we feel pretty good about it. if there's not any more activity, people can relax now. and move toward the coastline. but the very good news here, they did everything right. they set off the warnings as soon as there were a 7 or above. at a 7, you still want people to be prepared. you don't know if those waves are going to p
. >> very unlikely. i think that is right. >> reporter: wayne chairs depaul university's political science department and said that since moment of the states hit hard by hurricane sandy are heavily democratic, partisan considerations would block any agreement to let them delay voting for president. >> if we don't postpone the election, what is going to be the impact of the hurricane? >> i think the big impact of the hurricane is on voter turnout. i think we're going to so substantially lower voting in new york, new jersey, pennsylvania for sure. >> reporter: the labor department said the monthly u.s. jobs report will be released on time despite concerns it would be late because of sandy. earlier in the week, the department officials say they could not rule out a delay since much of the final work on the report is done in government buildings, which were closed during the storm, as you know. officials say that some employees came in tuesday to get it done. the final jobs report is expected before election day. >>> well, they could bring major traffic relief to the beltway. coming up, why t
to -- >> i know, but i'm talking about the social yol guests that write articles about science. let's check on the markets. futures are trading, but down about 61 points. half a percentage point for the dow industrials. could i make the point since we'll be looking for things to talk about today, i could make the point that statistics from labor day to the election 90% of the time if the markets up, the incumbent wins. the number of 13,090. so 17 points above where we close the day before labor day. ohio getting much closer apparently. anyway, let's look at the oil board. if you look at the s&p and how it's come down recently, a lot of the risk assets have come down at the same time the s&p has. went up on qe and once revenue started coming in it light or -- >> denniss also pointed out we could see big margin calls. >> take a quick look at currencies. or the ten year. probably down around 1.7% or so on the ten year. guess we'll go to kelly in london. you're back over there. you made it. that's good. >> i was on a flight out saturday night. i i know they started shutting town things on sunda
on on this sunday morning. let's get it back out to sam. sam, talk us through the science here. how much longer should they be nervous in hawaii this morning? >> well, the good news is, dan, that they did everything right here. i mean when you get a 7.7 on the western coast of canada, and you've got nothing but open water between it and hawaii, and this was a subsidence kind of quake, which means the plates are lying underneath each other. the other kicks the plate up. acts like a splash or flipper and creates a wave, if not just one wave, they thought it was four waves or think it's four waves as we've been counting them and have the tsunami warning center. all the buoys mean that those at the coastline are able to monitor the lift in the water, so the buoys got a tail underneath it and the sensor knows how high that wave is. we know they could have been very high. they could have been eight-foot waves but they weren't. anywhere from 6 inches to 2 feet to 4 feet as we've been able to monitor them. the good news. we've seen them move through and usually more than one and been able to watch them
sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. host: do you want to respond? guest: they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. and homeland security. the right thing to d
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
behind us is where the real science is going on. this is information that's being gathered, that can only be gathered by flying into the hurricane. this airplane has a doppler radar in the tail. what the doppler's picking up is showing up right here on these screens. they can then build a model of the storm, analyze the data. it gives us a sense if sandy is getting stronger or weaker, if the winds are getting more intense. we're onboard the hurricane hunter, herman. chris van clees, abc 7. >> a bird's-eye view of what is coming. all right. keep it here on abc for continuous coverage of hurricane sandy. all right. keep it here on abc for continuous coverage of hurricane @ >>> this morning on "world news now" -- surviving hurricane sandy. 50 million people are in the path of this super storm. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- surviving hurricane sandy. 50 million people are in the path of this super storm. and forecasters are warning of life-threatening flooding. >> the massive storm is already crippling the northeast and is about to unleash devastating torrential rains on top of trop
a bunch of stuff out today, the political science research which i'm very skeptical of. i would say for an incumbent president you have to do something. there's a lot of risk. there's a lot of potential for making a mistake. on a more simplistic level, i don't think if you're an incumbent you want people cranky when they go to the polls. it's not deep analysis, but it could be important. counterbalancing that, when people want the government to actually do something and do it well, they are much more likely to trust democrats in that circumstance. >> sure. >> the overall impact of the storm on the election is un unknowable. obama looks leader-like and presidential in the situation. he's part of the narrative of the storm, but then you pointed out, we're damaging early voting which is critical to the president's strategy. it becomes this situation like the president gets to look like a calm, strong leader in a crisis. that's the way some people read it. other people say the storm is obama's faumt and it proves he's weak. whatever way i see it, you see it that way. >> one problem for
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. >>> what has been happening along the coast of connecticut is being described as mayhem. just take new haven where 40 trees fell in 1 hour. we've been telling you about the fires in multimillion dollar homes along the shore. in greenwich, connecticut. and in old saybrook, several feet of water. that's where we find our reporter jeff stecker from nbc station wvit. jeff, good evening to you. what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, chris, where we're standing right now was about up to my upper thighs in water about three hours ago, so the storm surge has definitely receded. that was the big problem around here. actually behind me, some guys are checking on a building here that fronts righ
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> one of the biggest storms ever to hit the united states continues to roar across the northeast, bearing fierce wind, pounding rain. the toll so far, 10 deaths along our northeast corridor, massive flooding in coastal towns, major cities, all commercial air and rail travel at a standstill. at least 5 million homes without any power. at this hour, 50 million folks in the storm's path are wondering when will the danger finally be over in i know of no better person to ask than our meteorologist for the latest from the extreme weather center. >> reporter: you know, it will be a couple of days before the threat is completely over. the storm is certainly going to ease in its intensity and the wind field, while it spreads out, the winds will be less intense the next couple of days. but we still have threats. take a look. this storm got down to 940 millibars of pressure, that's the lowest we have ever had, north of cape hatteras, north of that outer point in the outer banks. we have never seen a s
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> morning. welcome, everybody, i'm soledad o'brien and you are watching a special edition of "early start." we're following the trail of superstorm sandy. and the storm itself has reeked havoc here in new york city. lots to tell you about this morning, dozens of homes have been destroyed by a massive fire in queens. we're watching those pictures. lower manhattan has been flooded by historic storm surge. a power transformer explode, plunging neighborhoods into darkness in lower manhattan and forced the evacuation as well o
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
reason. i don't know whether that's because how computer science is conducted in universities or i'm not with larry summers that i think it's all social and not physical. and on the other financial literacy. well, we didn't address that here because we're only looking at earnings and not at income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets, includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts and stocks and bonds all financial assets which is to say that every asset in the economy except homes. that's -- and art and gold or whatever. are held by the top 20% of the country. but financial literacy in the top 20%, i think does have an effect on ultimate in come. would it be a good idea to have greater financial literacy across income distribution? absolutely, and it would be better to figure out a way and there are lots of ways to do it for average people to accumulate assets other than their own homes. >> baby bonds, but that is another subjec
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
now, sprinkles here and there, no big deal. 59 at the airport and 62 at the maryland science center. a breezy day today but strongest coming in tomorrow, winds staying between 10 and 20 miles per hour during the day today. temperatures won't move much, upper 60's, -- upper 50's, low 60's. i've plotted some of the strongest wind guests as of the last hour. winds gusting close to 40 at the beach later on today and ava marie is down there. radar picking up heavy rain, outer bands of the storm that's way down to our south but along the delaware line on the eastern shore, heavy rain going on. sprinkles around baltimore and i suspect it will stay that way the next couple of hours but heavier rain shifting towards baltimore later today. here's the latest satellite imagery on sandy, a healthy looking storm, nice banding features, wrapping around the center so sustained winds still 75 miles per hour and it is technically still a hurricane. it's a few hundred miles off the coast of the carolinas. this is a gigantic storm with a huge wind field, 400 to 500 miles across. we will get into it eit
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's (vo) she's joy behar. >>current will let me say anything. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: the parting shot with bill press. this is the "bill press show." >> bill: all right. on this tuesday october 30, my parting shot for today. nobody's talking about it anymore but there still is a big election. one week from today. and democrats have to stop panicking every time they see a national tracking poll that shows this election to be a dead heat. first of all, a little reminder, that's not how we elect a president. there is not a national referendum. we elect presidents state by state. and that's looking good for obama. no matter what you think about the electoral college. by "huffington post" count obama has 277 electoral votes to romney's 206. colorado florida virginia and new hampshire are still tossup
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)